Final chance to participate in crowdfunding of the 2019 International Report on Snow & Mountain Tourism

Indoor slope in Finland - Photo copyright - Laurent Vanat. The 2020 International Report on Mountain & Snow Tourism has just been published.

Final chance to participate in crowdfunding of the 2019 International Report on Snow & Mountain Tourism

In order to both keep the International Report on Snow & Mountain Tourism available for free download on the Internet and to ensure the sustainability of its yearly update, several individuals, companies and organisations get mobilised since 2016 and participate to the crowdfunding campaign. This support enabled up to now to cover about half of the investment in the preparation of the 2016, 2017 and 2018 reports.

Final chance to participate in crowdfunding of the 2019 International Report on Snow & Mountain Tourism. Laurent Vanat photo.
Final chance to participate in crowdfunding of the 2019 International Report on Snow & Mountain Tourism. Laurent Vanat photo.

2019 will see a new updated issue of the International Report on Snow & Mountain Tourism, which will be released next April. The subscription to the 2019 crowdfunding campaign is therefore now open and a renewed call is addressed to all the fans of this world acknowledged international report to support it with a voluntary contribution. Independent of the amount of its contribution (over a technical minimum), each contributor will be listed in the acknowledgments section of the report.

To participate, please contribute using the link https://www.paypal.me/laurentvanat or announce by return e-mail to vanat@vanat.ch your contribution to the 2019 crowdfunding campaign and proceed by bank transfer. See bottom of this message for details.

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What Will Happen to the English Consumers of the French Mountains after March 29?

Les 3 Vallées in France. What Will Happen to the English Consumers of the French Mountains after March 29?

What Will Happen to the English Consumers of the French Mountains after March 29?

From Filièresport

Like most economic sectors, the French mountain wonders and prepares for a possible exit of Europe from Great Britain on March 29th where the British clientele is the first foreign clientele of the French resorts.

Hard, soft, soft … In recent weeks we use almost as many qualifiers to imagine the Brexit as to distinguish the quality of the fresh snow fallen in abundance in the resorts. Brexit hard, plan B or postponement of the exit, what kind of agreement on the withdrawal will be finally endorsed? Like the press releases issued in January by Matignon and Medef, the French economy is getting organized to prepare for the worst.

Les 2 Alpes- B.Longo. What Will Happen to the English Consumers of the French Mountains after March 29?
Les 2 Alpes- B.Longo. What Will Happen to the English Consumers of the French Mountains after March 29?

Many sectors are concerned about the financial consequences of this divorce. Starting with tourism and especially the French mountains where 9% of skier days are sold to British (DSF figures), a percentage which is multiplied up to 4 or 5 in some resorts! “Great Britain has about 1.2 million skiers and France is number 1 with 33.5% of the market,” says Jean-Marc Silva, General Manager of France Montagnes.

A clientele that could be cooled, at least in the first time, if the re-establishment of the borders was adopted (Hard Brexit) and the time to the customs and the formalities of passage lengthened.

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A-Basin quits the Epic Pass cash cow due to their lack of parking.

Photo: Arapahoe Basin- Dave Camara. Matt and Rio on the lift. A-Basin quits the Epic Pass cash cow due to their lack of parking.

A-Basin quits the Epic Pass cash cow due to their lack of parking.

Arapahoe Basin revenues doubled during the decade it was part of the Epic Pass, but parking problems outweigh the benefits of cash flow

From The Colorado Sun

Too many Epic Pass weekend skiers have forced A-Basin to abandon its decade-long partnership with Vail Resorts.

“We are pretty darn full on weekends and we don’t need any more people on weekends. If anything, we could probably whittle those numbers down a little bit,” Arapahoe Basin’s longtime leader Alan Henceroth said Monday, the day the resort announced it had pulled the plug on the Epic Pass partnership for the 2019-20 ski season. “Our parking is our pinch point.”

Pond Skimming at the end of the season at Arapahoe Basin. Photo: Ashey Ojala. Arapahoe Basin. A-Basin quits the Epic Pass cash cow due to their lack of parking.
Pond Skimming at the end of the season at Arapahoe Basin. Photo: Ashey Ojala. Arapahoe Basin. A-Basin quits the Epic Pass cash cow due to their lack of parking.

Arapahoe Basin, a local’s favorite with a rowdy selection of daunting steeps and a rootsy vibe, has thrived for 10 years under a deal with Vail Resorts that included the 1,428-acre ski area on the industry-dominating Epic Pass. Last fall the company sold more than 825,000 of those passes, offering skiing at 65 different locations.

Vail Resorts once owned Arapahoe Basin for a hot minute. But the U.S. Department of Justice in 1997 forced Vail Resorts to sell the ski area near the summit of Loveland Pass, citing antitrust issues after Vail acquired Ralston Resorts’ Summit County ski areas: Breckenridge, Keystone and A-Basin.

Vail’s Summit County ski areas have partnered with Arapahoe Basin on various shared passes since 1998.

Arapahoe Basin, which is owned by Canada’s Dundee Resort Development, was Vail Resorts’ first partner resort on the Epic Pass, which now includes access to privately owned, independent resorts such as Telluride, Sun Valley and Snowbasin.

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Crans-Montana avalanche claims a life

Crans-Montana avalanche claims a life. Crans Montana Ski Map.

Crans-Montana avalanche claims a life

From Swissinfo.ch

One of the people rescued from an avalanche at the Swiss ski resort of Crans-Montana died in the hospital overnight. Three other people were injured by the huge avalanche that struck on Tuesday. Rescuers suspended a coordinated search on Wednesday morning.

The man who died was a 34-year-old French national who worked at a ski resort in France, police said.

Rescuers worked all night above the resort in canton Valais to try to find skiers who might have been trapped in the avalanche. Witnesses had told police that there could be more people under the snow.

On Tuesday, a huge avalanche swept down the mountain at an altitude of 2,500 metres, just below the Plaine-Morte Glacier, and hit the popular Kandahar ski slope at 2.20pm at a spot known as “Passage du Major”.

This video by Swiss public radio, RTS, shows the extent of the avalanche. The police said it measured over 840 metres long and 100 metres wide and spread over the slope for about 400 metres.

This first part of this video has been filmed by one of the skiers on the piste when the avalanche produced. 

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The most expensive ski resorts in the USA

Deer Valley is considered the most expensive ski resort in the USA by a survey conducted by CheapHotels.org. The most expensive ski resorts in the USA.

The most expensive ski resorts in the USA

A new survey from CheapHotels.org ranks the most expensive ski resorts across the United States. After comparing 20 popular destinations, the survey found Deer Valley, in Utah, is the most expensive ski resort based on cost of lodging alone.

The survey used the average price for the cheapest available double rooms in each destination, through the months of February and March 2019, to establish its rankings. Only hotels with at least 3 stars and located within a ski resort were considered.

Beaver Creek Ski Carry. Photo: Vail Resorts. The most expensive ski resorts in the USA. Beaver Creek occupies 2nd place on this list.
Beaver Creek Ski Carry. Photo: Vail Resorts. The most expensive ski resorts in the USA. Beaver Creek occupies 2nd place on this list.

Guests staying at Deer Valley spend on average $543 per night for the most affordable double room; in second place for most expensive ski destination, Beaver Creek in Colorado charges $416 for its least expensive double room. Rounding out the top three is Alta resort in Utah, at $413 per night.

The top 10 destinations are mostly found in Utah and Colorado, with California and Wyoming making appearances in the fifth, seventh and ninth spots. California’s Squaw Valley is fifth most expensive overall at an average rate of $302 per night, while the state’s Northstar is $264 per night and in ninth place. In Wyoming, Teton Village is seventh overall, at $292 per night.

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Tamarack Resort Begins Mountain Face Lift Spring 2019

Tamarack Resort Begins Mountain Face Lift Spring 2019. Photo: Tamarack Resort.

Tamarack Resort Begins Mountain Face Lift Spring 2019

Construction resumes at the Village and a new ski lift will be installed as 2019/20 passes sales begin

Tamarack Resort embarks on a new round of resort improvements beginning Spring 2019. Along with the first phase completion of the Village Plaza, Tamarack is improving mountain terrain and opening up lift-served access to more than 200 acres.

Tamarack Resort Begins Mountain Face Lift Spring 2019. Photo: Tamarack Resort.
Tamarack Resort Begins Mountain Face Lift Spring 2019. Photo: Tamarack Resort.

“It will certainly be busy around the mountain this spring,” Tamarack Resort President Jon Reveal said. “Not only is the first phase of the Village Plaza, with retail, lodging and restaurants being completed, but the mountain is getting a generous addition of accessible terrain thanks to new mountain equipment, including a high-speed quad. We’re focused on improving the guest experience from the moment they arrive at the Village through their last run of the day.”

Construction crews will focus on completing the exteriors of the three Phase 1 Village buildings. The construction process has been on hold since 2009. They will simultaneously finish the first phase of retail, dining and guest service spaces in time for the 2019/2020 winter season.

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Breuil-Cervinia: chairlift failure: 27 skiers recovered by helicopter

Breuil-Cervinia: chairlift failure: 27 skiers recovered by helicopter

From Aostasera.it

VALTOURNENCHE – Due to a strong and sudden gust of wind the ski lift stopped and it was necessary the intervention of the Valle d’Aosta mountain rescue for the evacuation of skiers.

It took about fifty minutes for the recovery of 27 skiers stuck yesterdat morning on the Cretaz chairlift in Breuil-Cervinia. As explained by the President of Cervino Spa, Federico Maquignaz, a strong and sudden gust of wind blocked the ski lift, in the valley station, and it was necessary the intervention of the Aosta Valley Alpine rescue for the evacuation of skiers, all in good condition.

On the spot, with the help of the helicopter, technical guides of the Valdostano Alpine Rescue and of the Guardia di Finanza and, on the ground, operated by cableway operators have worked.

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Fortress Mountain Ski Resort is eyeing a 2020 opening

Fortress Mountain Ski Resort is eyeing a 2020 opening. Photo: Fortress Mountain Ski Resort.

Fortress Mountain Ski Resort is eyeing a 2020 opening

From Rocky Mountain Outlook.

According to its redevelopment plan, Fortress Mountain Ski Resort is on the road to open by December 2020.

The resort has received approval from Alberta Environment and Parks (AEP) last spring, to replace its potable water system and refurbish a sewer line. The company is hoping to complete this $4 million project this spring and if receiving the OK from AEP, they will begin constructing a new day log and lift system this summer.

Fortress Mountain Ski Resort is eyeing a 2020 opening. Photo: Fortress Mountain Ski Resort.
Fortress Mountain Ski Resort is eyeing a 2020 opening. Photo: Fortress Mountain Ski Resort.

Located 30 km south of Nakiska Ski Area on Highway 40, the resort has been closed since 2004. Today, KPOW cat skiing operates at the resort and they have been doing so since 2011.

Some private investors have been getting together for this plan and Ecosign Mountain Resort Planners have created a master plan.

On its first phase, the plan will make use of the resort’s existing ski terrain and refurbish five chairlifts. Many of the lifts will also be realigned to improve the resort’s fall line for a total lift capacity of 2,500 skiers.

This first part of the plan includes a building of 36,000 square feet that will be used as a day lodge at the base of the resort that will contain tickets, rentals, guest services, public toilets, lockers, ski school, a restaurant and a bar. The resort will install a magic carpet for beginners and a tube park for enthusiasts.

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Review on the Head Nexo Lyt 100 W G Ski Boots 2019

Review on the Head Nexo Lyt 100 W G Ski Boots 2019

Review on the Head Nexo Lyt 100 W G Ski Boots 2019

I have been suffering with my last pair of boots for the last five years. I went to buy them in one of the mainstream shops in the UK and did so with my two boys when they were little. The kid that did the fitting had not too much experience, and I wanted to believe him when he told me I had thin feet – Thin feet is something I really don’t have. And to be fair, with age, my feet are deforming a lot – getting wider with bunions and having lost my top arches. So, I have been suffering with my boots, trying to widen the shell in numerous trips to the ski shop.

Last weekend I went to Sudtirol and took my boots on my backpack on the plane. First day and I almost die skiing with them. This was in Kronplatz and by midday we went to visit a museum on the mountain (Lumen, Museum of Photography) and then I could not bear even being standing around on them. A friend that is local there now, offered me her hiking boots and took my ski boots. She asked me why I have bought Lange when Lange are the thinner boots in the market… and I was thinking she was right, why have I done that?

Review on the Head Nexo Lyt 100 W G Ski Boots 2019
Review on the Head Nexo Lyt 100 W G Ski Boots 2019. A back adjustment is good if you need more space for your calves.

The next day I had to get some rental boots to keep on skiing – I really feel uncomfortable with rental boots as they tend to let my ankle slip up and is hard to find a snug fit for me that do not squeeze my toes. Talking to my husband on the phone he told me that I should go and get new boots, that he has heard me for very long that I could not bear my boots even though I’ve tried to mould them over the years – if he says so, that he never incentivises my expenditure, I’ve thought I should do that!

So as soon as I’ve landed back from Verona airport, my husband took me to our local ski shop: Finches Ski Emporium. What I like about it is that it is a family owned shop, and the guys there know what they sell, plus they are passionate about skiing. Being a skiing tech geek myself, I just like to go and see what they have, plus I trust them that they are looking for something that will be good for me, not trying to get me off quickly to get another client.

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Lunch at Baita Sofie in Seceda, Val Gardena, Dolomiti Superski, Sudtirol

Baita Sofie on Monte Seceda in the Dolomites of Val Gardena on a sunny day. Lunch at Baita Sofie in Seceda, Val Gardena, Dolomiti Superski, Sudtirol.

Lunch at Baita Sofie in Seceda, Val Gardena, Dolomiti Superski, Sudtirol

Last weekend I was skiing in the Dolomites, specifically in Kronplatz, Alte Badia, Val Gardena and Alpe di Siusi, all in the Sudtirol province.

We were a group of very good skiers (except myself, that I am worst each year that goes by), and the Dolomites have received the biggest storm this year – between 50 and 80 cm in one go. This made that all the passes in the Sella Ronda were closed. But last Saturday, we left our lovely 5 stars hotel in Corvara (the Sassongher) to get up to the top of Alta Badia- The snow was soft, really nice, and deep. For being on piste, it was a bit tracked up, which was difficult for me, but slowly – really slowly, I get to meet my group, who were fresh of waiting for me! I’ve thought this year I was really in shape, but I guess that, as I am getting into my 50’s, it means that I need to do much more to be really fit!

Lunch at Baita Sofie in Seceda, Val Gardena, Dolomiti Superski, Sudtirol.
Lunch at Baita Sofie in Seceda, Val Gardena, Dolomiti Superski, Sudtirol.

Anyways, from Corvara, after a pit-stop at the Rifugio Bioch for a grappa – (I’ve stayed with a doppio espresso cappuccino decafeinatto- that is what I was drinking these days), we braved the windy morning and kept our way towards the Passo Gardena and then down into Selva in Val Gardena. From there was up again and down to Santa Cristina – the neighbouring village in Val Gardena. From down Santa Cristina we took an underground funicular to then take another gondola and a chairlift up to the Seceda.

From up there we skied a bit down to Baita Sofie- stuck pretty much at the top of Seceda, at 2,410 meters over sea level, with magnificent views of the Sassolungo and the Gruppo della Sella.

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